EMIL CARLSEN ARCHIVES

Emil Carlsen Archives is a Non-profit organization running the world's largest visual archive of the work of painter Emil Carlsen [1848-1932]

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

March 17, 1980

ECA Record Control Number: 17090

Record Level: Listing

Record Type: Exhibitions

Exhibition Type: Group Show

Exhibition Name: Connecticut and American Impressionism

Exhibition Host Name & Location:  William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Exhibition Dates: March 17 – May 30, 1980

Exhibition Additional Location & Dates (For Travel Exhibitions): A concurrent exhibition in three locations
William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “The Artists and The Landscape”, March 17 – May 30, 1980
Hurlbutt Gallery, Greenwich Library,Greenwich, CT, “The Cos Cob Clapboard School”, March 20 – May 31, 1980
Lyme Historical Society, Old Lyme, “The Art Colony at Old Lyme”, March 21 – June 21, 1980

Exhibition Sponsor: William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut ; Hurlbutt Gallery, Greenwich Library ; Lyme Historical Society

CATALOG

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

1980 William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, “Connecticut and American Impressionism: A concurrent exhibition in three locations”, March 17 – May 30

TRANSCRIPTION

“4. Emil Carlsen, Cherry Blossoms

Carlsen, Emil
4. Cherry Blossoms ILLUS. P. 12
n.d.: Probably Falls Village
Oil on canvas, 23-1/8 x 23-1/8 (58.7 x 58.7)
No signature
Hammer Galleries

5. Connecticut Hillside
1920s: Probably Falls Village
Etching, 3-3/8 x 4-3/8 (8.6 x 11.1)
No signature
The William Benton Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. Gilbert Erlechman
This is from a portfolio of six etchings published in 1979, for the first tune, from the original copper plates executed bv the artist.

6. Connecticut Hillside ILLUS. P. 63
c. 1920: Probably Falls Village
Oil on canvas, 29-1/4 x 27-3/8 (74.3 x 69.5)
Signed LR: Emil Carlsen
The Art Institute of Chicago, Walter H. Schulze Memorial

7. Connecticut Landscape
1920s: Probably Falls Village
Etching, 3-3/8 x 4-3/8  (8.6 x 11.1)
Signed LL: Emil Carlsen
The William Benton Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. Gilbert Erlechman
See note for cat. 5.

8. Landscape
c. 1925-30: Probably Falls Village
Oil on canvas, 29-3/4 x 26 (75.6 x 66)
No signature
Hammer Galleries
Study for The Garden of Gethsemene (oil on canvas, 43″ x 37″), first exhibited in 1930 at the Carnegie Institute and now in a private collection. The religious painting depicts Christ, with a halo, in the lower left of the landscape.

9 Night, Old Windham
1904: Windham Center
Oil on canvas, 50 x 40 (127 x 101.6)
Signed LR: Emil Carlsen; on reverse: Emil Carlsen Night, Old Windham 1904
W. David Lindholm Collection, Courtesy of R. H. Love Galleries, Inc., Chicago
The building at the right is almost certainly the cottage on J. Alden Weir’s property, where Carlsen and his family stayed on their frequent visits to Windham.

10, Wood Interior ILLUS. P. 64
c. 1921: Falls Village
Oil on canvas, 32 x 25-1/2 (81.3 x 64.8)
No signature
The Brett Mitchell Collection, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio

11. Wyndham Church, Connecticut ILLUS P 65
1906-07 or 1911: Windham Center
Oil on canvas. 18 x 15-1/8 (45.7 x 38.4)
Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts, Gift of Mrs. Daniel Fraad (Rita Rich ’37), 1977
The subject is St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Plains Road, Windham Center, where J. Alden Weir and his family were members. Weir presented to the church oil studies for stained glass windows commemorating the death of his first wife, Anna Dwight Baker. There is no explanation for Carlsen’s misspelling of Windham here, for the town name is correctly spelled in his title for a 1904 painting (cat. 9).

6. Emil Carlsen, Connecticut Hillside, c.1920

10. Emil Carlsen, Wood Interior, c.1921

11. Emil Carlsen, Wyndham Church, Connecticut

Carlsen, Emil
Born Oct. 19, 1853,
Copenhagen, Denmark.
Died Jan. 2, 1932, New York City
In Windham periodically, early 1900s; summers in Falls Village, 1905-32.

Emil Carlsen (who did not use his first name, Soren) studied architecture at Denmark’s Royal Academy for four years before emigrating to the United States in 1872 at the age of nineteen, but he enjoyed painting and there were painters in his family. Carlsen decided on an art career after an unsatisfying stint as an architect’s assistant in Chicago. He worked briefly under Danish painter Lauritz Holst in Chicago and, by 1874, was the first teacher of drawing and painting at the school that became part of the Chicago Art Institute. In 1875 he went to Paris for six months, where he saw the work of Chardin, which would influence his own still lifes, and where, by his own account, he painted “assiduously” from nature. When he returned to this country, he set up a studio in New York to begin his career in art.

For many years that career did not thrive. Carlsen soon moved to Boston, but his luck did not improve. He auctioned his paintings to try to pay bills, worked in Boston as a designer and engraver, and then, in Paris, painted commissioned still lifes for Blakeslee and other American dealers. While in Paris from 1884-86, he enrolled at the Academic Julian, where he associated not only with Americans like Willard Metcalf but with many French artists. His palette brightened considerably.

Largely self-taught himself. Carlsen spent many of the next thirty-five years teaching others. He became director of the San Francisco Art Association’s school in 1887, where, except for a brief stay in New York, he taught tor four years, Believing that sales and exhibition opportunities were limited in the Bay Area, in 1891 he moved east permanently. He began to teach both at the National Academy of Design and at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1896 he married Luella May Ruby in New York City, and in 1901 their son Dines, who would become an artist himself”, was born.

Almost fifty by then, Carlsen liad a reputation as a fine still-life painter, but after 1900 landscapes became increasingly important in his work. Honors came in quick succession; Member, Society of American Artists, 1902; Associate, National Academy of Design. 1904; Academician. N.A.D., 1906; Member, National Institute of Arts and Letters, 19f)6. His many prizes ranged from a gold medal for a still life at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, 1904, to the medal of honor for a seascape at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco, 1915. He exhibited at Folsom Callery and at Macbeth Gallery in New York, at Vose Galleries in Boston, and, after 1926, at Grand Central Art Galleries in New York, where he was an artist member of that cooperative. Group exhibitions were often with major figures of American Impressionism, including his close friends Metcalf, J. Alden Weir, who fondly called him “Old Carlsen,” and Childe Hassam, who liked to refer to Carlsen as the “Dane of American artists.”

It was after his marriage that Carlsen began to spend time away from cities, and it was to Connecticut he came with his wife and son. He probably visited Weir at Branchville, but after Weir inherited his father-in-law’s large house in Windham, Carlsen and his family went there frequently and even spent two or three summers in the early 1900s in a cottage on the grounds. Weir’s youngest daughter remembers well that the artists enjoyed painting together in the neighborhood during the day and socializing with the families in the evening. Carlsen wrote Weir at least one special letter of thanks “for the many years wc had your house at Windham.” He probably painted the cottage in Night, Old Windham (cat. 9).

Carlsen not only liked the idea of summers in the country, but he also seemed interested in the idea of artists working together in idyllic surroundings. The reason he bought a home in Falls Village, his son told people in that northwestern Connecticut town, was that one day in or before 1905 Carlsen had set out to see Old Lyme, where friends told him an art colony had developed. The railroad ticket agent had misunderstood Carlsen’s request and sold him a ticket to Lime Rock. When he realized the mistake, Carlsen decided to explore Lime Rock and neighboring Falls Village anyway, and he liked what he saw so much he bought a house in Falls Village in 1905. No art colony was there, but in later years art associations would develop both at Lime Rock and at nearby Kent. Carlsen frequently exhibited in their annual exhibitions. Carlsen and his family spent winters in New York City and occasionally travelled abroad or to Vermont or Maine, but he considered Falls Village his home and found most of his landscape subjects in the nearby woods, brooks, and hills until his death in 1932.

Further Reading
The Art of Emil Carlsen, 1853-1932. Exh. cat., Wortsman Rowe Galleries, San Francisco, 1975. Includes reprints of essays by Eliot Clark, Duncan Phillips, F. Newlin Price and others.

Carlsen, Emil pp. 55, 154-55, 161, 177;
cat. nos. 4-11; Illus. pp. 12, 63-65″

WORKS BY EMIL CARLSEN

REVIEWS/RELATED ARTICLES

 

Document Information

Digital-born Document Number:
ECA.2016.17090

Digital Document Provenance:
Original compiled and researched document by the Emil Carlsen Archives, 266 West 21st Street, Suite 4E, New York, NY 10011.

Document License:
Creative Commons Corporation  shareAlike (sa) license.  Some of the information contained within this document may hold further publication restrictions depending on final use.  It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine.

Image License:
The author of this artwork died more than 70 years ago. According to U.S. Copyright Law, copyright expires 70 years after the author’s death. In other countries, legislation may differ.

Record Birth Date:
December 26, 2016

Last Update:
December 26, 2016

©2013-2017 Emil Carlsen Archives

Digital-born Publication Title: Emil Carlsen Archives
Publication Subtitle: World's Largest Visual Reference Dedicated to the Preservation of the Work of Danish-American Impressionist/Realist Painter, Emil Carlsen [1848-1932]
Library of Congress Subject Authority Heading: Carlsen, Emil, 1853-1932
Emil Carlsen LC control no.: n 85141186
Publication Type: Online Integrating Resource
Language: English
Creator/Author: Emil Carlsen Archives
Published by: Emil Carlsen Archives, 266 West 21st Street, New York, NY 10011
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Publish Date: 2013 –
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