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The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, “The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition”, volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated

May 1, 1918

ECA Record Control Number: 21079

Record Level: Reference

Record Type: Magazine

Article Type: Work Mention

Key Title: The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition

Sub Title: -none-

Language: English

Author: staff

Publisher: The American magazine of art [Art and progress]
Publish Location: The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY

Date of Publication:  volume 9, number 7, May, 1918

Page: 288-291, not illustrated

Source: Google Books

Description: 1 magazine art clipping

Subjects:
Carlsen, Emil, 1848-1932.

Number of copies: 1

Digitized: yes

MAGAZINE

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, "The National Academy's ninety-third annual exhibition", volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, “The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition”, volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, "The National Academy's ninety-third annual exhibition", volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, “The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition”, volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, "The National Academy's ninety-third annual exhibition", volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, “The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition”, volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, "The National Academy's ninety-third annual exhibition", volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, “The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition”, volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, "The National Academy's ninety-third annual exhibition", volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

The American magazine of art [Art and progress], The American Federation of Arts, New York, NY, “The National Academy’s ninety-third annual exhibition”, volume 9, number 7, May, 1918, page 288-291, not illustrated.

TRANSCRIPTION

THE NATIONAL ACADEMY’S NINETY-THIRD ANNUAL EXHIBITION

The National Academy of Design’s ninety-third annual exhibition was held as usual in the Galleries of the American Fine Arts Society, New York, from March 13th to April 21st. It comprised 416 exhibits, paintings in oil, miniatures and sculpture, the first in greatest number. In spite of the fact that there were but few extraordinary works in this exhibition a high average was maintained.

The Academy exhibition differs from those held by the various art museums and associations through the country in as much as it is made up entirely of paintings
by members or submitted to the jury, no work shown therein being especially invited. For this reason it is perhaps more indicative of present tendencies. The Academy is always charged with being ultra conservative, and while it does insist upon a certain amount of what may be called academic training on the part of its exhibitors, still its policies are liberal and its doors are open to all those who possess sincerity and talent.  In the exhibition just closed. seventy-three of the works were by Academicians, sixty one by associates and 282 by non-members.

George Bellows, Gifford Beal and Van Dearing Perrine represented among the exhibitors the most gifted of the extremists, those whose chief effort is to create sensation and to present bare facts. Mr. Bellows showed two pictures—one a landscape with animals of uncertain variety, the other an Easter morning parade on Riverside Drive. Both were boldly painted but distinctly unlovely—graphic but bungling, lacking in that fine breadth and decision with which Winslow Homer would have rendered similar scenes.

In an entirely different manner, more reserved, more subtle, more significant landscapes by Bruce Crane interpreting both the aspect and the spirit
of nature—work.  Which attracted and at the same time retained interest.

To this exhibition a group of western made notable contributions, were two painters among these was Walter Ufer, who was awarded the Thomas B. Clarke prize for his painting of Indians entitled Going East, painted undoubtedly in Taos.

The Julius Hallgarten prizes for pictures in oils painted in the United States by American citizens under thirty-five years of age, were, as announced in the April number of THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE or ART, awarded to Leopold Seyffert of Philadelphia, Lazar Raditz of New York and Felix Russmann of Chicago, all three presumably “adopted sons.”

William T. Pearson, Jr., won the Saltus medal for one of his characteristic compositions 0f fowls and landscape—altogether decorative and engaging.

Oddly enough, the. two Altman prizes for landscape were awarded to a marine by Paul Dougherty and a city picture by Childe Hassam, both. however, excellent.  Mr. Hassam’s representing Fifth Avenue bedecked in flags in honor of the Allies was peculiarly timely.

The place of honor in the Vanderbilt Gallery was given to a portrait of Mrs. Chase and her son, painted some years ago by William M. Chase and Irving R. Wiles—a work of collaboration, typical of both painters and yet not precisely like the work of either.

Kenyon Cox and Albert Herter showed portraits of unique interest painted in the style of the old Italian masters with great elaboration of detail and smoothness of finish. The portrait by Mr. Cox was of his son’s wife, the portrait by Mr. Herter, of a man in a fur coat and cap.

In strong contrast to these was Mr. Seyffert’s prize-winning portrait of his wife, painted with extreme breadth and unusual bravado.

There was a portrait by Cecilia Beaux of a young girl, lent by Mrs. H. P. Whitney, and one of Miss Beaux, herself, by Robert B. Brandegee, Victor D. Hecht showed an excellent portrait of Louis Kronberg, the well-known painter.

Charles Bittinger, now in the Naval Reserve Force. was represented by a little picture of the Blue Room at the White House. Everett L. Warner, now a Lieu tenant in the United States Naval Reserve, contributed an excellent New York winter landscape painted in Central Park.

Emil Carlsen was particularly well represented by a marine, a picture of the Caribbean sea as seen from the Island of St. Thomas, begun some time ago but only
lately finished.

Frederick Waugh showed a large canvas entitled The Line Storm showing the ocean in tumult.

The Secretary of the Academy, Mr. Harry W. Vatrous, was represented in this exhibition by a picture entitled The Moon Path, a. nocturne painted very much in
the spirit of Blakelock at his best—so much so that a story is told of it having deceived a well known dealer.

An excellent decorative California landscape was contributed by Maurice Braun.  There was a fine picture of Nature’s Garden—Norway, by William H. Singer, Jr.,and an excellent Pennsylvania landscape The South Wind, standing to the credit of Cullen Yates, Chauncey Ryder made an exceedingly strong showing by a large canvas entitled The Hills of Bennington, a picture bringing to mind the Scotch highlands. Gardner Symons and Edward W. Redfield both showed characteristic winter pictures, as did also Jonas Lie, Charles Rosen, John F. Folinsbee and others.”

WORKS BY EMIL CARLSEN

 

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Digital-born Document Number:
ECA.2017.21079

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Original compiled and researched document by the Emil Carlsen Archives, 266 West 21st Street, Suite 4E, New York, NY 10011.

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The author of this artwork died more than 70 years ago. According to U.S. Copyright Law, copyright expires 70 years after the author’s death. In other countries, legislation may differ.

Record Birth Date:
April 23, 2017

Last Update:
April 23, 2017

©2013-2017 Emil Carlsen Archives

Digital-born Publication Title: Emil Carlsen Archives
Publication Subtitle: World's Largest Visual Reference Dedicated to the Preservation of the Work of Danish-American Impressionist/Realist Painter, Emil Carlsen [1848-1932]
Library of Congress Subject Authority Heading: Carlsen, Emil, 1853-1932
Emil Carlsen LC control no.: n 85141186
Publication Type: Online Integrating Resource
Language: English
Creator/Author: Emil Carlsen Archives
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